nanihoo:

I need a fic where…

Hearing the scandalized whispers about the very evident age difference between her and Matthew, Kat begins to worry if Matthew would want a partner that’s more his age. Elizabeta assures her that would never be the case, (Let’s be honest that boy is happily wrapped around your little finger) but suggests if Kat wants to spice things up a bit that perhaps they should go lingerie shopping. They do, and after a while Kat finds a few things though her heart isn’t it. 

Matthew gets home that evening, shedding all his hockey practice gear at in the foyer. He doesn’t see Kat in the main areas of their home so he heads for their bedroom, taking the stairs three at a time. However, he stops at the door, eyes widening when he realizes Kat’s crying inside. He opens the door only to be smacked in the face with a very expensive looking lacy under-thing. Kat stands by the bed, startled, arm raised like she’d meant to hurl the bra at the door out of anger not at his suddenly appearing head. Kat stares at him for a moment then collapses onto the bed, crying “They were supposed to be a surprise for you”.

Matt looks at the bed and the shopping bags scattered around, mixed with magazines and tissues, and it hits him why Kat is so upset.

"It’s the thought that counts… but I don’t think it’s my size"

Kat looks up, tired and baffled, then burst out into teary laughter. Because, of all things, he’s tried to put the bloody thing on. She feels his warm hands cup her face and leans into them. Matthew looks at her “I love you” and the sheer force of his sincerity blows her away

she kisses one of his palms and gives him a loving, watery smile. “I love you too, you dork.”

With some extra credit to Twyx for the final line.

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RTD vs. Moffat and fanfiction

insolitaparvapuella:

kilodalton:

One of the things that’s always struck me as a very indirect, but very telling measure of the relative enthusiasm for the RTD era over the Moffat era is fanfic.

Yes, fanfic.

Fanworks such as fic are really not something casual fans tend to spend a whole lot of time doing. You do fanworks (writing, art, whatever) when you’re inspired by something. Fanworks are for the people who LOVE the show, who are CAPTIVATED by it, who BREATHE it.

So it always kind of strikes me when I go to a site like fanfiction.net and the first few stories (as well as at least half the page lol) are Ten/Rose, even now, almost 8 years after she was his companion.

image

Now… an only slightly smaller site is Teaspoon, which has been around for ages and actually lets us see the percentages of stories that are one era vs. another.

LOOK AT THIS:

image

The Ninth Doctor was only around for a single season and still has 1.5 times the fanfic written about him on Teaspoon as the Eleventh Doctor, who was around for 3 times as long. And the TENTH Doctor… jesus. More than 5.5 times the number of fics about him as about the Eleventh Doctor, even though they were on the show the same number of seasons.

Now yes… I know, I know… I can hear it now: “But fans have had more years in which to write about Nine and Ten than about Eleven!” True… but the same would then hold even MORE true for the Classic Who Doctors—but their numbers are still fairly low across the board, so there goes that argument down the drain.

I wish I had had the foresight to post this during the airings of s5, s6 and s7—even when the episodes were airing, and fans should be the most pumped up—this still held true. The fanfics were still overwhelmingly RTD-based, even when Moffat was trying his best to reel us in with wibbly-wobbly scripts and a much, much larger budget than RTD had.

As an RTD era fan, I love this. There is ‘something’ (coherent writing, perhaps?) about his era that still has captured fans imaginations to the extent that they are overwhelmingly writing fanfiction about his era vs. Moffat’s era. This is empirically true on FF.net, here on Tumblr, was true on LJ when people still used it more often—and is quite clear from the numbers on Teaspoon as well.

Wait wait wait! I crunched a few numbers and did a super-informal study and found out some interesting facts. From here on out, it is all information I picked up from a day hanging around and tallying fanfics.

What was the method used?

I explored three particular facets of Doctor Who fan fiction: Fics published on fanfiction.net during the month of May in 2012; the 100 top-favourited fics on fanfiction.net; the 100 top kudos-ed fics on AO3.

Why no Teaspoon?

Honestly, Kilodalton has it covered and I couldn’t figure out a better way to test the “are RTD’s characters more enduring than Moffat’s?” question.

May 2012? Seems a little arbitrary.

I wanted to observe the fandom in the closest form of “at rest” it has. May 2012 was a little more than halfway through the long break between series six and seven.

This temporal distance from any important material being aired prevents a flood of episode tags or reaction-fic and speculation-fic from skewing the results too strongly. The goal of this was to see which characters are the most enduring to writers, not what storylines made us go “I need to write fix-fic”.

The year also plays a factor. Two series into Eleven’s run with an established romantic plotline from River gives Eleven two important factors needed to combat interesting variables in Ten’s run: his romantic arc with Rose and his comparatively long run.

The break between series six and seven is one of the cleanest and calmest breaks, with less promotional material than the post-series seven hype around the 50th.

Basically, people cannot claim Ten is getting more fanfic than Eleven because of his romantic storyline when Eleven had a bloody marriage at the end of series six and a literal kiss literally solved the plot and a ton of innuendo, and Ten cannot get away with “he was around longer” as an excuse. Two years and two series is more than enough time to get acquainted with Eleven.

How did fics get counted?

For both the fanfiction.net counts, I simply looked at the character tags. These are supposedly used to show the most important characters and so can be more-or-less relied on to dictate who is showing up. On AO3 I read all the character tags and did my sorting from there. I found fics easily divide into certain categories:

Fanfic feat. Eleven: Fan fiction tagged with the Eleventh Doctor and no other Doctors.

Fanfic feat. Ten: Ditto, but with Ten. For the sake of simplicity, Tentoo is counted as the Tenth Doctor. I’ll talk more about that later.

Fanfic feat. Nine: Ditto, but with Nine.

Moffat-era companion pieces: Works featuring Moffat-era companions and no Doctor to speak of.

RTD-era companion pieces: Ditto, but with RTD.

Mixed-era fics: Fics that crossed more than one Doctor’s era, whether through multiple Doctors, companions, or a Doctor-companion mix. Fics exclusively under Classic Who fell under the Classic Who category instead, even if there was era-crossing.

Classic Who: Fics that take place completely within the classic era. For giggles, I counted which Doctors were getting written, too.

OC-centric: Fics where I couldn’t find a specific Doctor tagged, but the summary clearly indicated an OC taking centre stage. This includes original regenerations of the Doctor.

RPF: Real people fic. Probably doesn’t need explanation.

Undefined: Strictly for use in the AO3 count, where the character was only tagged as “The Doctor” with no contextual clues or fusion fics like Sherlock being a Time Lord known at the Detective or popular-character-is-actually-a-Time-Lord.

No more stalling! Let’s see some numbers!

From the great May 2012 fanfic tally:

Fanfic feat. Eleven: 160

Fanfic feat. Ten: 196

Fanfic feat. Nine: 22

Moffat-era companion pieces: 21

RTD-era companion pieces: 36

Mixed-era fics: 71

Classic Who: 23 (One/Academy!Doctor = 8, Eight = 4, Four = 4, Two = 2, Shalka!Doctor = 1, Five = 1, Seven = 1, who the fuck knows? = 2)

OC-centric: 13

RPF: 3

There was also one fic that was only tagged with Big Finish-exclusive character Brax.

From the fanfiction.net top 100 favourites:

Fanfic feat. Eleven: 8

Fanfic feat. Ten: 52

Fanfic feat. Nine: 6

Moffat-era companion pieces: 1

RTD-era companion pieces: 3

Mixed-era fics: 30

And from the AO3 top 100 kudos fic round-up (excluding a guide to Omega!verse that was #1 by a wide margin):

Fanfic feat. Eleven: 24

Fanfic feat. Ten: 18

Moffat-era companion pieces: 9

RTD-era companion pieces: 12

Mixed-era fics: 17

Undefined: 17

RPF: 3

Looking at these numbers, the only place where Eleven has an advantage is in the number of kudos he gets in the top 100 AO3 fics. Eleven/River likewise beat out Ten/Rose by a fair margin. And despite this, the Tenth Doctor and Doctor/Rose hold a small lead over Eleven and Doctor/River in total number of fics written, once outside the top 100. Thank you to topaz-eyes for that!

AO3 also featured a hell of a lot of crossover. While I didn’t tally the actual number of crossovers and massive multi-fandom fic collections, the number of fics in the top 100 that were actually strictly Doctor Who couldn’t have numbered more than 50%.

I was a little iffy on the inclusion of RPF but ultimately just gave in. Interesting fact: all six RPF I ran across were Matt/Alex.

What non-empirical things were learned?

Holy shit, so much.

May 2012 had a lot of Ten to go around. And yeah, a lot of Ten/Rose, too. But I was surprised by the amount of other Ten ships I got to witness. Ten/Jack, Ten/Donna, Ten/Master, and Ten/OC all appeared several times (roughly in order of frequency), and Ten/Martha popped up once.

Tentoo and Tentoo/Rose might’ve given Ten an additional 10% in the May 2012 survey, but barely featured anywhere else, if it all.

Eleven’s main squeeze was obviously gonna be River, but a tiny amount of Eleven/Amy, Eleven/Rory, and Eleven/Rory/Amy happened on the May 2012 and the AO3 count. There was also a persistent trend towards Eleven/Rose that absolutely dominates the mixed-era count in the ff.n top 100 tally and definitely had a strong influence on the May 2012 count, too. Not so much the AO3 count.

Mixed-era fanfics leaned heavily towards “Eleven interacting with RTD-era companion” or other such interactions. Mixed-era rarely meant Classic Who and the bulk of mixed-era fic is Eleven and RTD-era.

ff.n really loves multi-era fics (“Rose/Nine, Rose/Ten, Rose/Eleven” showed up more than once, to my delight), but AO3 scored more mixed-era fics through oneshot collections.

RTD’s companions slightly but consistently outscored the Moffat companions in Doctor-free pieces. River had surprisingly few solo or Doctor-free outings in fic anywhere whereas Rose definitely got a few everywhere but AO3.

On the ff.n top 100, exclusively-Nine fics showed up at least twice before an Eleven-exclusive did.

AO3 barely mentioned any Doctor’s outside of Ten and Eleven (note their top 100 doesn’t include Nine once, let alone a Classic Doctor), but the May 2012 count gave a handful of Classic Who fics. The ff.n top 100 featured at least two fics where Classic Doctors encounter Rose Tyler (one with Ten, one without).

AO3 fics were significantly more likely to mention Tumblr or the like. They also significantly favoured multi-fandom endeavours popular on Tumblr like Wholock or Who-vengers.This is probably because crossovers are cordoned off to another section on ff.n. Possibly a source of bad data from me, and something I may consider following up on.

Conclusions?

While the numbers between Ten and Eleven are rather close, the fact Ten’s era closed off around four years ago and is still consistently ranking very close to slighty ahead of Eleven is telling. And there are actual numbers backing this idea up!

Guys! I did the thing and did a new count of the AO3 top 100 kudos’d fics.

And what’s the difference?

This time, any fic tagged with a fandom outside of Doctor Who and Torchwood was completely ignored. No fusion fics, not cross-overs, no “Neville is actually a Time Lord!” fics. And Torchwood fics lacking the presence of a Doctor or key companion were also left off the list. Otherwise, same as the last count.

Fanfic feat. Eleven: 44

Fanfic feat. Ten: 23

Fanfic feat. Nine: 3

Fanfic feat. Twelve: 4

Moffat-era companion pieces: 2

RTD-era companion pieces: 3

Mixed-era fics: 22

So while Eleven has a clear lead in the top 100 there’s also inclusion of 12 (which boggled my mind until it was made clear it was “River is there for 11s regeneration” fic, some of which came prior to 12s announcement), 9 finally made it onto the AO3 radar, and once crossovers were nixed it took 5 pages for a Doctor-free fic with Moffat’s companions to show up. Whoa.

And any new anecdotal findings?

Yes! Without the crossovers skewing the count, it became clear that all but, like, three multi-era fics had Ten as a key player. And the few that didn’t were Doctor/Rose. Oh, and one Nine/River fic.

If a fic wasn’t Eleven/River, there was a fairly healthy chance of it featuring Jack. But Jack and Eleven/River? Never the twain shall meet (okay, maybe once?).

Torchwood has a far greater presence than one would expect. Once again, the Moffat-era and Torchwood rarely interacted, but RTD characters were all over those fics.

And crossovers and massive multi-fandom fic collections completely dominate the top kudos’d fics on AO3. It took my almost three times the number of pages on AO3 to get the top 100 fics without outside fandoms.

But do look at the fic counts and compare them to ff.nets counts, and Ten doesn’t get even close to the same trouncing as Eleven does. And when it comes to companion exclusives, RTD’s companions are enduring despite being off our screens for five years. Gotta say, it wasn’t too radical a change of results. But now my conscience feels a little clearer.

Tags: anti moffat

weirdnessloveandscifi:

achievementhugger:

thebabbagepatch:

ilacktact:

mycosmicreality:

adeyami:

US students will be able to shield themselves during school shootings with the latest in body armour, the Bodyguard Blanket
http://goo.gl/WwvECT
Are fucking kidding me? I have been sitting at home and constantly watching the news after the events of yesterday. For those of you who are wondering, I am a junior at REYNOLDS HIGH SCHOOL! I was there when the shooter kept running in the halls trying to open the doors and get in. I was there in the dark praying and crying while my librarian kept saying ” they’ll have to kill me before they touch my kids” I have known her for three years, her determination to keep us safe broke her heart. Seeing this, that little children need protection in school. Are we sending kids to a battlefield? I have three little brothers ranging from 5-10, and still people have the nerve to speak about the second amendment? Really? I can’t even type anymore. I’m so disgusted and frustrated. When will you realize that it’s important to have gun control? When a shooter is pointing a gun at your child? Is that when you’ll realize that guns aren’t something to be kept around. People say it’s a free country but honesty, this country is more oppressed and diseased than any other country.

Show me ONE instance where gun control and gun free zones prevented school shootings.



Let me tell you guys a story. In 1996, in a little town in Australia called Port Arthur, a gunman killed 35 and injured 23. This place was a tourist attraction, with plenty of visitors and locals going about their business. 35 people died.That’s 35 marriages, anniversaries, birthdays or uni degrees. 35 people left Port Arthur in body bags.At the time, we had a pretty conservative government, and the Prime Minister at the time (in hindsight) was kind of a dick. But within two weeks of the shooting, Howard instituted a massive reform and buyback of all firearms. 
But it must be a statistical flaw, you say, there weren’t that many massacres before 1996, right? No, WRONG. In the eighteen years leading up to Port Arthur, there had been 13 mass shootings. 
But April, you ask, this couldn’t possibly have worked could it? Wouldn’t it only have reduced the mass shootings? WRONG.Since 1996, there have been ZERO mass shootings. That’s right, ZERO. FUCKING ZILCH. There have been scattered homicides, however:
How many schools have been raided and children murdered? NONE.How many film buffs have been murdered in their seats? NONE.How many innocent lives have been lost to the barrel of a gun? NONE.
On top of this, homicides involving the use of guns, and youth suicide involving the use of guns has declined dramatically, by up to 60%
Australia, however much the environment tries to kill you, is a safe haven, and you can walk the streets with 99% assurance that you won’t fall victim to a drive by shooting.
Your move, America.

Hi, UK here.
Back in 1996 a guy killed 16 little kids and their teacher in Dunblane before shooting himself. That’s 18 people gone for ever. Because of that, the UK government passed legislation making it illegal to buy/possess pretty much any gun. There are a few people with guns but it’s so hard to get one generally people just don’t have guns.
Do you know how many mass shootings we’ve had since 1996?
0.
So go on American politicians, tell us again how it wouldn’t make a difference.

Interesting fact: a mass shooting in Norway, the rising tide of gun violence in Canada, and some drug cartel violence in Mexico (three countries with reasonable gun restrictions that the NRA Does Not Like) have been connected to the lax restrictions on selling firearms over the internet in America.
If gun violence is an illness, the NRA and American politicians are anti-vaxxers.

weirdnessloveandscifi:

achievementhugger:

thebabbagepatch:

ilacktact:

mycosmicreality:

adeyami:

US students will be able to shield themselves during school shootings with the latest in body armour, the Bodyguard Blanket

http://goo.gl/WwvECT

Are fucking kidding me? I have been sitting at home and constantly watching the news after the events of yesterday. For those of you who are wondering, I am a junior at REYNOLDS HIGH SCHOOL! I was there when the shooter kept running in the halls trying to open the doors and get in. I was there in the dark praying and crying while my librarian kept saying ” they’ll have to kill me before they touch my kids” I have known her for three years, her determination to keep us safe broke her heart. Seeing this, that little children need protection in school. Are we sending kids to a battlefield? I have three little brothers ranging from 5-10, and still people have the nerve to speak about the second amendment? Really? I can’t even type anymore. I’m so disgusted and frustrated. When will you realize that it’s important to have gun control? When a shooter is pointing a gun at your child? Is that when you’ll realize that guns aren’t something to be kept around. People say it’s a free country but honesty, this country is more oppressed and diseased than any other country.

Show me ONE instance where gun control and gun free zones prevented school shootings.

image

Let me tell you guys a story.
In 1996, in a little town in Australia called Port Arthur, a gunman killed 35 and injured 23. This place was a tourist attraction, with plenty of visitors and locals going about their business. 
35 people died.That’s 35 marriages, anniversaries, birthdays or uni degrees. 35 people left Port Arthur in body bags.
At the time, we had a pretty conservative government, and the Prime Minister at the time (in hindsight) was kind of a dick. But within two weeks of the shooting, Howard instituted a massive reform and buyback of all firearms. 

But it must be a statistical flaw, you say, there weren’t that many massacres before 1996, right? No, WRONG. 
In the eighteen years leading up to Port Arthur, there had been 13 mass shootings. 

But April, you ask, this couldn’t possibly have worked could it? Wouldn’t it only have reduced the mass shootings? WRONG.
Since 1996, there have been ZERO mass shootings. That’s right, ZERO. FUCKING ZILCH. There have been scattered homicides, however:

How many schools have been raided and children murdered? NONE.
How many film buffs have been murdered in their seats? NONE.
How many innocent lives have been lost to the barrel of a gun? NONE.

On top of this, homicides involving the use of guns, and youth suicide involving the use of guns has declined dramatically, by up to 60%

Australia, however much the environment tries to kill you, is a safe haven, and you can walk the streets with 99% assurance that you won’t fall victim to a drive by shooting.

Your move, America.

Hi, UK here.

Back in 1996 a guy killed 16 little kids and their teacher in Dunblane before shooting himself. That’s 18 people gone for ever. Because of that, the UK government passed legislation making it illegal to buy/possess pretty much any gun. There are a few people with guns but it’s so hard to get one generally people just don’t have guns.

Do you know how many mass shootings we’ve had since 1996?

0.

So go on American politicians, tell us again how it wouldn’t make a difference.

Interesting fact: a mass shooting in Norway, the rising tide of gun violence in Canada, and some drug cartel violence in Mexico (three countries with reasonable gun restrictions that the NRA Does Not Like) have been connected to the lax restrictions on selling firearms over the internet in America.

If gun violence is an illness, the NRA and American politicians are anti-vaxxers.

(via mostly-dead-is-slightly-alive)

RTD vs. Moffat and fanfiction

kilodalton:

One of the things that’s always struck me as a very indirect, but very telling measure of the relative enthusiasm for the RTD era over the Moffat era is fanfic.

Yes, fanfic.

Fanworks such as fic are really not something casual fans tend to spend a whole lot of time doing. You do fanworks (writing, art, whatever) when you’re inspired by something. Fanworks are for the people who LOVE the show, who are CAPTIVATED by it, who BREATHE it.

So it always kind of strikes me when I go to a site like fanfiction.net and the first few stories (as well as at least half the page lol) are Ten/Rose, even now, almost 8 years after she was his companion.

image

Now… an only slightly smaller site is Teaspoon, which has been around for ages and actually lets us see the percentages of stories that are one era vs. another.

LOOK AT THIS:

image

The Ninth Doctor was only around for a single season and still has 1.5 times the fanfic written about him on Teaspoon as the Eleventh Doctor, who was around for 3 times as long. And the TENTH Doctor… jesus. More than 5.5 times the number of fics about him as about the Eleventh Doctor, even though they were on the show the same number of seasons.

Now yes… I know, I know… I can hear it now: “But fans have had more years in which to write about Nine and Ten than about Eleven!” True… but the same would then hold even MORE true for the Classic Who Doctors—but their numbers are still fairly low across the board, so there goes that argument down the drain.

I wish I had had the foresight to post this during the airings of s5, s6 and s7—even when the episodes were airing, and fans should be the most pumped up—this still held true. The fanfics were still overwhelmingly RTD-based, even when Moffat was trying his best to reel us in with wibbly-wobbly scripts and a much, much larger budget than RTD had.

As an RTD era fan, I love this. There is ‘something’ (coherent writing, perhaps?) about his era that still has captured fans imaginations to the extent that they are overwhelmingly writing fanfiction about his era vs. Moffat’s era. This is empirically true on FF.net, here on Tumblr, was true on LJ when people still used it more often—and is quite clear from the numbers on Teaspoon as well.

Wait wait wait! I crunched a few numbers and did a super-informal study and found out some interesting facts. From here on out, it is all information I picked up from a day hanging around and tallying fanfics.

What was the method used?

I explored three particular facets of Doctor Who fan fiction: Fics published on fanfiction.net during the month of May in 2012; the 100 top-favourited fics on fanfiction.net; the 100 top kudos-ed fics on AO3.

Why no Teaspoon?

Honestly, Kilodalton has it covered and I couldn’t figure out a better way to test the “are RTD’s characters more enduring than Moffat’s?” question.

May 2012? Seems a little arbitrary.

I wanted to observe the fandom in the closest form of “at rest” it has. May 2012 was a little more than halfway through the long break between series six and seven.

This temporal distance from any important material being aired prevents a flood of episode tags or reaction-fic and speculation-fic from skewing the results too strongly. The goal of this was to see which characters are the most enduring to writers, not what storylines made us go “I need to write fix-fic”.

The year also plays a factor. Two series into Eleven’s run with an established romantic plotline from River gives Eleven two important factors needed to combat interesting variables in Ten’s run: his romantic arc with Rose and his comparatively long run.

The break between series six and seven is one of the cleanest and calmest breaks, with less promotional material than the post-series seven hype around the 50th.

Basically, people cannot claim Ten is getting more fanfic than Eleven because of his romantic storyline when Eleven had a bloody marriage at the end of series six and a literal kiss literally solved the plot and a ton of innuendo, and Ten cannot get away with “he was around longer” as an excuse. Two years and two series is more than enough time to get acquainted with Eleven.

How did fics get counted?

For both the fanfiction.net counts, I simply looked at the character tags. These are supposedly used to show the most important characters and so can be more-or-less relied on to dictate who is showing up. On AO3 I read all the character tags and did my sorting from there. I found fics easily divide into certain categories:

Fanfic feat. Eleven: Fan fiction tagged with the Eleventh Doctor and no other Doctors.

Fanfic feat. Ten: Ditto, but with Ten. For the sake of simplicity, Tentoo is counted as the Tenth Doctor. I’ll talk more about that later.

Fanfic feat. Nine: Ditto, but with Nine.

Moffat-era companion pieces: Works featuring Moffat-era companions and no Doctor to speak of.

RTD-era companion pieces: Ditto, but with RTD.

Mixed-era fics: Fics that crossed more than one Doctor’s era, whether through multiple Doctors, companions, or a Doctor-companion mix. Fics exclusively under Classic Who fell under the Classic Who category instead, even if there was era-crossing.

Classic Who: Fics that take place completely within the classic era. For giggles, I counted which Doctors were getting written, too.

OC-centric: Fics where I couldn’t find a specific Doctor tagged, but the summary clearly indicated an OC taking centre stage. This includes original regenerations of the Doctor.

RPF: Real people fic. Probably doesn’t need explanation.

Undefined: Strictly for use in the AO3 count, where the character was only tagged as “The Doctor” with no contextual clues or fusion fics like Sherlock being a Time Lord known at the Detective or popular-character-is-actually-a-Time-Lord.

No more stalling! Let’s see some numbers!

From the great May 2012 fanfic tally:

Fanfic feat. Eleven: 160

Fanfic feat. Ten: 196

Fanfic feat. Nine: 22

Moffat-era companion pieces: 21

RTD-era companion pieces: 36

Mixed-era fics: 71

Classic Who: 23 (One/Academy!Doctor = 8, Eight = 4, Four = 4, Two = 2, Shalka!Doctor = 1, Five = 1, Seven = 1, who the fuck knows? = 2)

OC-centric: 13

RPF: 3

There was also one fic that was only tagged with Big Finish-exclusive character Brax.

From the fanfiction.net top 100 favourites:

Fanfic feat. Eleven: 8

Fanfic feat. Ten: 52

Fanfic feat. Nine: 6

Moffat-era companion pieces: 1

RTD-era companion pieces: 3

Mixed-era fics: 30

And from the AO3 top 100 kudos fic round-up (excluding a guide to Omega!verse that was #1 by a wide margin):

Fanfic feat. Eleven: 24

Fanfic feat. Ten: 18

Moffat-era companion pieces: 9

RTD-era companion pieces: 12

Mixed-era fics: 17

Undefined: 17

RPF: 3

Looking at these numbers, the only place where Eleven has an advantage is in the number of kudos he gets in the top 100 AO3 fics. Eleven/River likewise beat out Ten/Rose by a fair margin. And despite this, the Tenth Doctor and Doctor/Rose hold a small lead over Eleven and Doctor/River in total number of fics written, once outside the top 100. Thank you to topaz-eyes for that!

AO3 also featured a hell of a lot of crossover. While I didn’t tally the actual number of crossovers and massive multi-fandom fic collections, the number of fics in the top 100 that were actually strictly Doctor Who couldn’t have numbered more than 50%.

I was a little iffy on the inclusion of RPF but ultimately just gave in. Interesting fact: all six RPF I ran across were Matt/Alex.

What non-empirical things were learned?

Holy shit, so much.

May 2012 had a lot of Ten to go around. And yeah, a lot of Ten/Rose, too. But I was surprised by the amount of other Ten ships I got to witness. Ten/Jack, Ten/Donna, Ten/Master, and Ten/OC all appeared several times (roughly in order of frequency), and Ten/Martha popped up once.

Tentoo and Tentoo/Rose might’ve given Ten an additional 10% in the May 2012 survey, but barely featured anywhere else, if it all.

Eleven’s main squeeze was obviously gonna be River, but a tiny amount of Eleven/Amy, Eleven/Rory, and Eleven/Rory/Amy happened on the May 2012 and the AO3 count. There was also a persistent trend towards Eleven/Rose that absolutely dominates the mixed-era count in the ff.n top 100 tally and definitely had a strong influence on the May 2012 count, too. Not so much the AO3 count.

Mixed-era fanfics leaned heavily towards “Eleven interacting with RTD-era companion” or other such interactions. Mixed-era rarely meant Classic Who and the bulk of mixed-era fic is Eleven and RTD-era.

ff.n really loves multi-era fics (“Rose/Nine, Rose/Ten, Rose/Eleven” showed up more than once, to my delight), but AO3 scored more mixed-era fics through oneshot collections.

RTD’s companions slightly but consistently outscored the Moffat companions in Doctor-free pieces. River had surprisingly few solo or Doctor-free outings in fic anywhere whereas Rose definitely got a few everywhere but AO3.

On the ff.n top 100, exclusively-Nine fics showed up at least twice before an Eleven-exclusive did.

AO3 barely mentioned any Doctor’s outside of Ten and Eleven (note their top 100 doesn’t include Nine once, let alone a Classic Doctor), but the May 2012 count gave a handful of Classic Who fics. The ff.n top 100 featured at least two fics where Classic Doctors encounter Rose Tyler (one with Ten, one without).

AO3 fics were significantly more likely to mention Tumblr or the like. They also significantly favoured multi-fandom endeavours popular on Tumblr like Wholock or Who-vengers.This is probably because crossovers are cordoned off to another section on ff.n. Possibly a source of bad data from me, and something I may consider following up on.

Conclusions?

While the numbers between Ten and Eleven are rather close, the fact Ten’s era closed off around four years ago and is still consistently ranking very close to slighty ahead of Eleven is telling. And there are actual numbers backing this idea up!

Tags: anti moffat

"Finally having a Companion who is like me and has mental issues, and hearing so many people go “BUT I WANT A NORMAL COMPANION!!”"

thehufflepuffwholeaptthroughtime, managing to say in one sentence what i’ve been trying to say for a year (via eightsbutterflyroom)

I super don’t mind this (you’re entitled to your opinion and if you like Amy then blessings upon your head), but Amy deserved so much more than Moffat’s writing gave her.

Amy’s “issues” were legit in that they were mentioned in canon and are a faint and semi-consistent thread of her characterization, but they’re also romanticized from here to the moon and back. Romanticizing “issues” is gross. She’s “mad Amelia Pond”, and that’s supposed to be a term of endearment when Eleven says it.

When a Moffat critic talks about wanting a “normal” companion they are almost 100% not meaning they want a neurotypical companion. They mean a companion who is an ordinary human. Whether male, female, or a variation thereupon; whether neurotypical or atypical; regardless of skin colour; regardless of backstory; regardless of age; regardless of attractiveness.

People who describe a desire for “ordinary” companions want a companion who is special because of who they are and not because there’s a deep universe-spanning conspiracy surrounding them. (See: the cracks that make Amy a target of the Doctor’s curiosity or Clara’s whole splintered-in-time deal.) Moffat-critics asking for “normal” companions are on your side. We desperately want characters that break the mould, and that challenge the typical characters shown on television. We’re of the opinion that the problem isn’t Amy, it’s Moffat’s writing for Amy.

Please, please, please don’t fight with a strawman Moffat critic. You’ll get absolutely nowhere because we’re on your side. We want characters like Amy, who have mental issues, and we want a writer who will do them justice. We just happen to think that Moffat did not do the character of Amy justice.

heroofgallifrey:

image

I like that the watchcry of the Anti-Moffat movement is that time Ten acted like an entitled twat and destroyed someone’s life for no reason other than they did something the wrong way. Thus paving the way for more horrible things to come.

Really sums up that portion of the fanbase nicely.

You mean that time that Ten reacted badly against the Prime Minister when she committed a fucking war crime?

That time when Ten suffered the consequences of his actions? (Like, RTD talks about it I think in a confidential, saying that his actions with Harriet Jones allowed the Master to move in.)

That time when Harriet Jones returned with her decision (to kill an enemy that had peacefully surrendered and withdrawn, not exactly solid ground moral-wise) neither confirmed nor condemned by the narrative and her standing by her choice and being treated like a hero?

Holy shit, people opposed to Moffat are invoking a time when, y’know, a morally nuanced sub-plot ran the length of Ten’s run?

Read whatever insane subtext you want, but you should know that there’s no general consensus with the use of “don’t you think he looks tired”. People have come to object the term for whatever reasons they feel are appropriate.

Look, if I said Moffat’s fan wildly generalised you’d be pissed, right? But you just made a wild generalisation of the anti-Moffat movement.

If you’re interested in a long debate on the relative virtues and vices of Moffat’s run, I’m more than happy to oblige. It’ll be fun. But sitting on the anti-Moffat tag posting stuff like this is a little rude, yeah?

(via heroofgallifrey-deactivated2014)

A CanUkr A/B/O AU because I cannot control myself

An unexpected (literally, I didn’t think I would be writing this until I did) gift for the endlessly amazing nanihoo. Based off of this post.

The hand that touched Katyusha’s letter was soft but for two calluses, from writing most like, and merely brushed the paper next to her hand. Surprised, Katyusha glanced up, following the length of Montreal Canadien hockey jersey up to blond curls and a concerned look.

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drbluesman:

Why on earth everyone on Tumblr hates Steven Moffat, almost as though everyone is being controlled by an alien intelligence, is beyond me. Everyone keeps acting like the Russell T. Davies era was absolutely perfect and the Moffat era is horrible, even as they say how much they love individual Moffat episodes. I have taken it upon myself to point out a few things about both eras which will even the score a bit. (Let me preface this by stating that I loved the Davies era too, and David Tennant is still in my top 3 favorite Doctors, so I’m not trying to hate on Davies at all.)
1) Moffat has created more iconic villains than Davies.
My definition of iconic is either ”likely to be used by a future production team.” or “memorable enough to be famous from their single appearance.” Thus, the Daleks are iconic, as are the Cybermen. Moffat created the Weeping Angels and the Silence, both of whom will be used again (if they weren’t the next production team would be idiots), while Davies created the Judoon, which have reappeared in the Moffat area (specifically, in the Pandorica episode.) Davies created some iconic creatures too: the Sycorax (unlikely to come back again) and the Judoon (more likely.) I love the Sycorax design and wish that they would come back, but unless someone writes a story like Mark Gatiss did with the Ice Warriors, its pretty unlikely. And everyone loves the Judoon, those big rhino police created to test David Tennant’s accent (really). They’re more likely to come back. The other villains solely created by Davies, the Adipose and the Slitheen, are the ones we’re all trying to forget. So Moffat is better at creating iconic villains (“Are you my Mummy?” will be a part of Doctor Who forever), while Davies is very good at refining existing villains. Which is just fine.
2. Davies’ heroines had similar backstories as well.
Everyone seems to really hate it that the Eleventh Doctor picked up both Amy Pond and Clara Oswald because there was something about them that intrigued/baffled him. What they don’t realize is that Rose Tyler, Martha Jones, and Donna Noble all left with the Doctor because they had horrible home lives and wanted to escape, and the Doctor subsequently fixed their lives when they left him. No one would say that Rose, Martha, and Donna are too similar, so why are Amy and Clara too similar?
3. Moffat’s gay characters are likeable.
 Who doesn’t love Captain Jack Harkness and Madam Vastra? It’s easy to think that Captain Jack was created by Davies, since Davies helmed Torchwood and wrote the big episodes that Jack had with the Tenth Doctor, but remember that Moffat actually created Jack (his first appearance was with the Empty Child). Moffat writes characters who happen to be gay (like Canton Everett Delaware III, if I’ve got it right) but whose sexual orientation is not the whole reason for their existence. During the Davies era, the number of gay characters the Doctor ran into could almost get to self parody levels, and they were really only there for “shock value”.
4. There were some awful episodes under Davies, too.
Confession time: I didn’t hate The Rings of Akhaten. Sure, it wasn’t as good as some of the other ones, but it introduced Clara well, gave us some wonderful new aliens to use again someday, and some pretty impressive special effects. It was certainly better than Midnight, probably the single worst thing to come out of the Davies era. You know the one, where the alien repeated everything that the Doctor said for 45 minutes. I’m also not a fan of the Lady Cassandra (we usually skip the Platform One episode, which is probably why I don’t even remember the title), or of the Slitheen (it’s sad that Christopher Eccleston was up against some of the worst villains when he had so few episodes.) Moffat has made some mistakes, certainly (I’m not a fan of the new Daleks), but he and Davies are both human. They’re bound to make mistakes.
In conclusion, don’t expect anyone to be infallible. Everyone is going to screw up, and what is perceived as awful today may become tomorrow’s classic. Moffat is a great writer, and we are lucky to have him working on Doctor Who. May his reign be long and glorious. 



Whoa whoa whoa, let me explain to you a— actually, no. Allow me to explain why your description of why Moffat is awesome is flawed. I promise to be nice, seeing as you’ve been very reasonable about your points. (I do swear a lot, but not because I’m angry or trying to be rude, I promise you.) I know noworshipformoffat did a rebuttal, but I started writing this before that happened and I think more than one anti-Moffat rebuttal may be helpful.
Believe me, not everyone on Tumblr hates Moffat. If they did, the “moffat hate” tag wouldn’t be the ridiculous quagmire of “hating on the haters” and genuine critique and complaints it is now. Even so, there are perfectly legitimate reasons to dislike Moffat’s writing, from the brazen sexism to the incredibly messy and inconsistent plotting. Time travel is now the plot of the show, rather than the facilitator of the plot. Characters lack rounding and development. Representation of media minorities isn’t doing so well.
I wrote a 7000 word piece on why I think Moffat’s era is lacking (and this was prior to the ____ of the Doctor fuck-ups), and it didn’t even touch the representation issues. I’m not being mind-controlled and the implication that my opinion differing from the norm is somehow abnormal and caused externally rather than me performing analysis on the media I watch feels a little rude. I’ve mentioned loads of other people who would disagree with your assessment in this response as well, and if you’d like citations I will be happy to track down posts and articles to back up my points.
And no, I don’t find the Davies era perfect (good heavens, no!). I happen to prefer it and I am a compare/contrast essayist by nature, so I use the best of Davies’ era to highlight the many pitfalls of the Moffat era, but that’s hardly equal to putting him on a pedestal. But I have noticed a consistent pattern with my favourites in Davies’ and Moffat’s eras. RTD wrote several of my favourite episodes in his era, and Moffat only contributed “The Empty Child” and “The Doctor Dances”. Moffat has never written an episode within his own era that I would count in my favourites (there were moments I liked, but in the end the episode would on the whole be soured by something).
So, if I may…

1) Moffat’s iconic villains are internally inconsistent/poorly developed
The Weeping Angels are probably the most famous monsters to come from New Who, and for good reason. Their introduction, while not a particular favourite of mine, resonated with the fandom and the concept/execution of the Angels in “Blink” suits the love of meta-fiction that this generation of media has. In “Blink” there are several points where Sally is not looking and yet she is not zapped. This, combined with the ending of the episode, implies that the audience is affecting the Angels through the fourth wall, which is very cool.
The Angels become one of the most interesting oneshot baddies of the RTD era. Not the scariest, in my opinion (I find 90% of jump-scares boring, and the Angels use a lot of jump-scaring) but definitely iconic. Then the Angels return in series 5, the fandom goes ballistic, and the Fridge Logic sets in. The new rules from the Angel two-parter make Sally’s victory impossible, or at least extremely unlikely. She looks the Angels in the eyes more than once and keeps photographs of them with her long after her encounter with no problems.
And while I liked Angel Bob (mostly for the voice actor) giving the Angels a voice spoils their menace. The Angels are frightening because they are other, because their biology is directly related to quantum physics in a way no life on earth is, because they cannot be reasoned with or explained. Giving the Angels a voice makes them into beings with motives that can be understood and manipulated. Letting Angel Bob speak reduces the Angels from a force of nature to just-a-baddie. And the neck-breaking thing was pretty unnecessary and further removed the Angels from forces of natures to just more villains.
They also move onscreen, and while I was able to justify it and keep the “audience is protecting the characters through the fourth wall” by saying they’re moving in the dark spaces between the frames, it directly contradicts what Ten said about them in “Blink”. If they’re observed, they turn to stone. Now, it’s if they think they’re observed, which is really lame because it removes their relationship with quantum physics and the business with observation of particles.
And don’t even get me started on the problems with “The Angels Take Manhattan”, because we’ll be here all day. Suffice to say, the Angels don’t become more canonically consistent in that episode.
The Silence have similar problems. They are creatures who are manipulated by perception, but no longer are they able to reach through the screen and allow us to become part of their menace, as was the case with the Angels. We remember the Silence when the characters don’t. And while I guess the available dramatic irony is cool, I think that sort of thing should be left to Hannibal, since they are able to perform some sustained irony over seasons with dark-as-fuck-puns, rather than holding the irony and mystery for exactly one-and-a-half episodes.
The only time the Silence’s ability to be forgotten is exploited in any memorable fashion in the meta-text, it’s to avoid showing a badass fight in “The Wedding of River Song”. So, uh, I was disappointed. And beyond that, while the Silence have an interesting shtick their motives and actions tend to be super inconsistent. They kill exactly one human for no fucking reason (except to show that they’re villains), for a plan that is convoluted beyond reasonable expectation, then team up with the Doctor because….? Rule of Cool, as far as I can tell.
And their presence in humanity runs against one of the best themes in the RTD era: the incredible potential of humanity. The Moon two-parter tells us that all of human achievement until 1969 came from the Silence manipulating us, not by our own abilities and talents. What an utterly demoralising message.
And then the Doctor arranges to have them all killed by the human race, which is so out of character from what is established by Nine and Ten (especially Ten!!!) that it aches.
Once you take the Angels out of the equation, which really should be done by “The Angels Take Manhattan” because wow did that episode spoil everything interesting about the Angels and ruin their canon, the following Moffat monsters get weaker and weaker. The Snowmen are silly, nonsensical, and are fuelled by perception (that being the third Moffat monster with that trait, he’s run out of interesting things to do with it). The Whispermen… wear top hats? Honestly, watching the episode I had no clue what made them menacing at all, beyond the fact a dude in prison says a nursery rhyme about them. And how prison dude knew about them is anybody’s guess. And the Great Intelligence, a somewhat obscure Classic Who character, is introduced so badly I had no fucking clue he was an established Classic character until I looked him up to see if external materials established more motive and characterisation for him than “I will kill the Doctor”, which was Korvarian’s vague motive, if I remember rightly. That’s a genuinely awful introduction, if I do say so myself.
This isn’t to say these monsters haven’t become emblematic of Moffat’s era. A strong start in the RTD episodes, rehashing some of the same material used there by series six, completely repeating himself (badly) by series seven. But iconic and brilliant? Once you get past the Weeping Angels, intriguing beings that they are upon introduction, where is that collection of iconic and brilliant Moffat monsters? Because I don’t really see them.
RTD may not have made as many monsters you like, but that doesn’t mean that popular culture doesn’t remember the Ood or the Slitheen (and we’re not all trying to forget them, trust me. I love the Slitheen episodes and was a huge fan of their appearance in the Sarah Jane Adventures). And try telling the official Doctor Who tumblr that we’re all trying to forget the Adipose, because they haven’t gotten the memo. Your personal experience with the creatures of Doctor Who does not equal the experience of all people. I more or less feel the exact opposite to everything you feel about them, and I know people who fully agree with me, too. And that doesn’t make my personal experience any more representative of the majority. In a fandom as vast and wildly broken as Doctor Who, any majority opinion is still going to only represent a fraction of the fandom at large. What validates my point is analysis of the media I take in. Like in any Literature essay ever, your viewpoint and argument is valid if you can find evidence to support your point. Which I can.

2) Davies’ heroines did not have similar backgrounds, they had vaguely-similarish heroic character arcs, and that’s not the same thing
Rose, Martha, and Donna had the same background? Seriously? Rose was working-class with a loving but smothering mother (who thought that working as a shopgirl somewhere like Henrik’s would give her airs and graces) and boyfriend she went on cruise control with, the loss of her father had a key and powerful impact on her life through her mother’s stories. Rose’s backstory left her drifting in a life where she could never use her fully potential and didn’t know she had that potential. The Doctor gave her knowledge of her own strength in series one and a full grasp of her abilities by series two.
Martha was raised in a big upper-middle class family that also happened to be broken. Her relationship with both her mum and dad seems to be good, but she’s a go-between for them and appears to be The Great Negotiator in her family. Meanwhile, she clearly loves both her sister and brother and gets along well with them. Martha is getting higher education and has the very high goal of being a doctor (and her whole family is supporting her, not trying to pin her down like Jackie tried, with good intentions, with Rose), and she’s almost there. Martha may not fully understand how amazing she is, but she’s wielding her potential already and aiming for a goal. The Doctor shows her how amazing she is to herself and by the end of series three Martha is ready to leave, knowing how amazing she is, giving her family priority because that’s what she believes is right, and getting the Doctor to come when she calls.
Donna is older than both Martha and Rose, and part of her story is about how she hasn’t lost this potential even if she missed her chance to go with the Doctor the first time. She lacks the confidence of both Martha and Rose, even half a series in when both of them were more or less confident about themselves. That can be owed to her own home life, where Sylvia is verbally abusive and tears Donna down, and Wilf is kind and supportive but doesn’t necessarily push Donna into being more, or better.
How are these three women the same?
The backstories of Moffat’s heroines — Amy, Clara, and River — may be different, but that seems to do diddly for their characterisation. The Moffat heroine tends to be constructed from the same scaffolding tropes with different colours of paint.
And my objection to the Doctor picking up Clara the way he did is not because it’s similar to the way he picked up Amy, it’s because he chooses to take Clara along because she is a metaphorical Rubik’s Cube. Clara is treated as a puzzle to be solved, and despite all characters insisting that Clara is an ordinary girl, Eleven never faces the consequences for treating her as a mystery instead of a person. Instead, he is vindicated. He gets his answer. And then Clara just sort of fades into the background of the following stories until she is needed to emotionally manipulate Eleven, rather than getting more character development.
You seem to think I’m mad about Amy and Clara and River for completely different reasons than I am.

3) Moffat’s queer characters don’t serve as adequate representation
First off, and I cannot scream this loudly enough, Jack was designed by RTD and Moffat’s writing did not give Jack his omnisexual orientation. The assumption that Jack was a Moffat creation flies in the face of everything known in television writing. Please please please don’t start preaching that Moffat designed Jack, because that takes away the success of a gay writer creating a wildly popular and memorable character and gives it to the man who writes and allows sexual assault to be written as a joke.
And I’m not terribly fond of Vastra and Jenny. Even if I was, their relationship exists in the realm of “because I said so” and innuendoes. Compare the loving and very visually obvious relationship between Amy and Rory to Vastra and Jenny. And I would be okay with the lack of any visual cues to their relationship if there was better representation elsewhere. But there isn’t. Canton’s sexuality is written as a punchline and there’s no visual evidence of it existing at all. River’s apparent bisexuality had to be confirmed on Twitter, because there’s no sign of it anywhere in the show. The married marines don’t even have names because they’re such a long list of identifiers, who needs to acknowledge them as people with names?
Really, the number of gay characters in the RTD era was self-parody? Really? Off the top of my head, Shakespeare was bi (as has been speculated in academia for a while), Skye Silvestre’s previous partner had been a woman, Jake was not confirmed to be gay but the writing left loads of people assuming so, Torchwood is its own thing (and I don’t watch it much, so I can’t really say anything about the characters), and the son and footman in “The Unicorn and the Wasp” (who had to keep their relationship secret and still managed to be physically affectionate on screen) were definitely together and it was remarked how cruel that the footman couldn’t openly mourn the death of his lover. I’m certainly there were more, but off the top of my head that’s not a vast majority.
The words “gay agenda” were thrown about during the RTD era, but the four most important characters were three women who were only in heterosexual romances (Rose, Martha, and Donna) and the Doctor, whose sexuality allowed a romance with Rose but was not openly sexual except in Moffat’s episodes, allowing for the argument that the Doctor is on the asexual spectrum or is demisexual. Moffat’s writing for the Doctor has actively defied that theory.
Of course, if RTD was pushing a gay agenda for writing more than a few characters who aren’t straight, then Moffat is a progressive hero for sensationalising people who aren’t straight and making their sexualities into punchlines.

4) Just because you don’t like it doesn’t mean everyone agrees
Confession: I am head-over-heels in love with “Rings of Akhaten” and “Hide” and “Nightmare in Silver” and “The Crimson Horror” (assault of Jenny excluded), but I still think Moffat’s era is weaker than American beer.
Here are some interesting facts for you: “Midnight” is absolutely beloved in my neck of the woods and you disliking it would not appear to be the majority opinion. “The Name of the Doctor” pulled 70% of the viewers “Journey’s End” pulled despite the hype building up to it. Of the ten lowest-viewed regular episodes of New Who, four came from the second half of series seven. Kilodalton did some stats that show audience numbers, on the whole, appear to be dropping. Your praise for “Rings of Akhaten” apply almost word-for-word to “The End of the World” (the Platform One episode that kick-starts Rose’s character growth and shows off some of effects the Time War had on Nine).
You like Moffat, which is great for you, but your critique falls very flat because it relies on deliberate misrepresentations of arguments and personal opinion. Like Moffat all you want, but you’ll not be changing people’s opinion with this.
edited 06/29/14 for readability and tagging

drbluesman:

Why on earth everyone on Tumblr hates Steven Moffat, almost as though everyone is being controlled by an alien intelligence, is beyond me. Everyone keeps acting like the Russell T. Davies era was absolutely perfect and the Moffat era is horrible, even as they say how much they love individual Moffat episodes. I have taken it upon myself to point out a few things about both eras which will even the score a bit. (Let me preface this by stating that I loved the Davies era too, and David Tennant is still in my top 3 favorite Doctors, so I’m not trying to hate on Davies at all.)

1) Moffat has created more iconic villains than Davies.

My definition of iconic is either ”likely to be used by a future production team.” or “memorable enough to be famous from their single appearance.” Thus, the Daleks are iconic, as are the Cybermen. Moffat created the Weeping Angels and the Silence, both of whom will be used again (if they weren’t the next production team would be idiots), while Davies created the Judoon, which have reappeared in the Moffat area (specifically, in the Pandorica episode.) Davies created some iconic creatures too: the Sycorax (unlikely to come back again) and the Judoon (more likely.) I love the Sycorax design and wish that they would come back, but unless someone writes a story like Mark Gatiss did with the Ice Warriors, its pretty unlikely. And everyone loves the Judoon, those big rhino police created to test David Tennant’s accent (really). They’re more likely to come back. The other villains solely created by Davies, the Adipose and the Slitheen, are the ones we’re all trying to forget. So Moffat is better at creating iconic villains (“Are you my Mummy?” will be a part of Doctor Who forever), while Davies is very good at refining existing villains. Which is just fine.

2. Davies’ heroines had similar backstories as well.

Everyone seems to really hate it that the Eleventh Doctor picked up both Amy Pond and Clara Oswald because there was something about them that intrigued/baffled him. What they don’t realize is that Rose Tyler, Martha Jones, and Donna Noble all left with the Doctor because they had horrible home lives and wanted to escape, and the Doctor subsequently fixed their lives when they left him. No one would say that Rose, Martha, and Donna are too similar, so why are Amy and Clara too similar?

3. Moffat’s gay characters are likeable.

 Who doesn’t love Captain Jack Harkness and Madam Vastra? It’s easy to think that Captain Jack was created by Davies, since Davies helmed Torchwood and wrote the big episodes that Jack had with the Tenth Doctor, but remember that Moffat actually created Jack (his first appearance was with the Empty Child). Moffat writes characters who happen to be gay (like Canton Everett Delaware III, if I’ve got it right) but whose sexual orientation is not the whole reason for their existence. During the Davies era, the number of gay characters the Doctor ran into could almost get to self parody levels, and they were really only there for “shock value”.

4. There were some awful episodes under Davies, too.

Confession time: I didn’t hate The Rings of Akhaten. Sure, it wasn’t as good as some of the other ones, but it introduced Clara well, gave us some wonderful new aliens to use again someday, and some pretty impressive special effects. It was certainly better than Midnight, probably the single worst thing to come out of the Davies era. You know the one, where the alien repeated everything that the Doctor said for 45 minutes. I’m also not a fan of the Lady Cassandra (we usually skip the Platform One episode, which is probably why I don’t even remember the title), or of the Slitheen (it’s sad that Christopher Eccleston was up against some of the worst villains when he had so few episodes.) Moffat has made some mistakes, certainly (I’m not a fan of the new Daleks), but he and Davies are both human. They’re bound to make mistakes.

In conclusion, don’t expect anyone to be infallible. Everyone is going to screw up, and what is perceived as awful today may become tomorrow’s classic. Moffat is a great writer, and we are lucky to have him working on Doctor Who. May his reign be long and glorious. 

Whoa whoa whoa, let me explain to you a— actually, no. Allow me to explain why your description of why Moffat is awesome is flawed. I promise to be nice, seeing as you’ve been very reasonable about your points. (I do swear a lot, but not because I’m angry or trying to be rude, I promise you.) I know noworshipformoffat did a rebuttal, but I started writing this before that happened and I think more than one anti-Moffat rebuttal may be helpful.

Believe me, not everyone on Tumblr hates Moffat. If they did, the “moffat hate” tag wouldn’t be the ridiculous quagmire of “hating on the haters” and genuine critique and complaints it is now. Even so, there are perfectly legitimate reasons to dislike Moffat’s writing, from the brazen sexism to the incredibly messy and inconsistent plotting. Time travel is now the plot of the show, rather than the facilitator of the plot. Characters lack rounding and development. Representation of media minorities isn’t doing so well.

I wrote a 7000 word piece on why I think Moffat’s era is lacking (and this was prior to the ____ of the Doctor fuck-ups), and it didn’t even touch the representation issues. I’m not being mind-controlled and the implication that my opinion differing from the norm is somehow abnormal and caused externally rather than me performing analysis on the media I watch feels a little rude. I’ve mentioned loads of other people who would disagree with your assessment in this response as well, and if you’d like citations I will be happy to track down posts and articles to back up my points.

And no, I don’t find the Davies era perfect (good heavens, no!). I happen to prefer it and I am a compare/contrast essayist by nature, so I use the best of Davies’ era to highlight the many pitfalls of the Moffat era, but that’s hardly equal to putting him on a pedestal. But I have noticed a consistent pattern with my favourites in Davies’ and Moffat’s eras. RTD wrote several of my favourite episodes in his era, and Moffat only contributed “The Empty Child” and “The Doctor Dances”. Moffat has never written an episode within his own era that I would count in my favourites (there were moments I liked, but in the end the episode would on the whole be soured by something).

So, if I may…

1) Moffat’s iconic villains are internally inconsistent/poorly developed

The Weeping Angels are probably the most famous monsters to come from New Who, and for good reason. Their introduction, while not a particular favourite of mine, resonated with the fandom and the concept/execution of the Angels in “Blink” suits the love of meta-fiction that this generation of media has. In “Blink” there are several points where Sally is not looking and yet she is not zapped. This, combined with the ending of the episode, implies that the audience is affecting the Angels through the fourth wall, which is very cool.

The Angels become one of the most interesting oneshot baddies of the RTD era. Not the scariest, in my opinion (I find 90% of jump-scares boring, and the Angels use a lot of jump-scaring) but definitely iconic. Then the Angels return in series 5, the fandom goes ballistic, and the Fridge Logic sets in. The new rules from the Angel two-parter make Sally’s victory impossible, or at least extremely unlikely. She looks the Angels in the eyes more than once and keeps photographs of them with her long after her encounter with no problems.

And while I liked Angel Bob (mostly for the voice actor) giving the Angels a voice spoils their menace. The Angels are frightening because they are other, because their biology is directly related to quantum physics in a way no life on earth is, because they cannot be reasoned with or explained. Giving the Angels a voice makes them into beings with motives that can be understood and manipulated. Letting Angel Bob speak reduces the Angels from a force of nature to just-a-baddie. And the neck-breaking thing was pretty unnecessary and further removed the Angels from forces of natures to just more villains.

They also move onscreen, and while I was able to justify it and keep the “audience is protecting the characters through the fourth wall” by saying they’re moving in the dark spaces between the frames, it directly contradicts what Ten said about them in “Blink”. If they’re observed, they turn to stone. Now, it’s if they think they’re observed, which is really lame because it removes their relationship with quantum physics and the business with observation of particles.

And don’t even get me started on the problems with “The Angels Take Manhattan”, because we’ll be here all day. Suffice to say, the Angels don’t become more canonically consistent in that episode.

The Silence have similar problems. They are creatures who are manipulated by perception, but no longer are they able to reach through the screen and allow us to become part of their menace, as was the case with the Angels. We remember the Silence when the characters don’t. And while I guess the available dramatic irony is cool, I think that sort of thing should be left to Hannibal, since they are able to perform some sustained irony over seasons with dark-as-fuck-puns, rather than holding the irony and mystery for exactly one-and-a-half episodes.

The only time the Silence’s ability to be forgotten is exploited in any memorable fashion in the meta-text, it’s to avoid showing a badass fight in “The Wedding of River Song”. So, uh, I was disappointed. And beyond that, while the Silence have an interesting shtick their motives and actions tend to be super inconsistent. They kill exactly one human for no fucking reason (except to show that they’re villains), for a plan that is convoluted beyond reasonable expectation, then team up with the Doctor because….? Rule of Cool, as far as I can tell.

And their presence in humanity runs against one of the best themes in the RTD era: the incredible potential of humanity. The Moon two-parter tells us that all of human achievement until 1969 came from the Silence manipulating us, not by our own abilities and talents. What an utterly demoralising message.

And then the Doctor arranges to have them all killed by the human race, which is so out of character from what is established by Nine and Ten (especially Ten!!!) that it aches.

Once you take the Angels out of the equation, which really should be done by “The Angels Take Manhattan” because wow did that episode spoil everything interesting about the Angels and ruin their canon, the following Moffat monsters get weaker and weaker. The Snowmen are silly, nonsensical, and are fuelled by perception (that being the third Moffat monster with that trait, he’s run out of interesting things to do with it). The Whispermen… wear top hats? Honestly, watching the episode I had no clue what made them menacing at all, beyond the fact a dude in prison says a nursery rhyme about them. And how prison dude knew about them is anybody’s guess. And the Great Intelligence, a somewhat obscure Classic Who character, is introduced so badly I had no fucking clue he was an established Classic character until I looked him up to see if external materials established more motive and characterisation for him than “I will kill the Doctor”, which was Korvarian’s vague motive, if I remember rightly. That’s a genuinely awful introduction, if I do say so myself.

This isn’t to say these monsters haven’t become emblematic of Moffat’s era. A strong start in the RTD episodes, rehashing some of the same material used there by series six, completely repeating himself (badly) by series seven. But iconic and brilliant? Once you get past the Weeping Angels, intriguing beings that they are upon introduction, where is that collection of iconic and brilliant Moffat monsters? Because I don’t really see them.

RTD may not have made as many monsters you like, but that doesn’t mean that popular culture doesn’t remember the Ood or the Slitheen (and we’re not all trying to forget them, trust me. I love the Slitheen episodes and was a huge fan of their appearance in the Sarah Jane Adventures). And try telling the official Doctor Who tumblr that we’re all trying to forget the Adipose, because they haven’t gotten the memo. Your personal experience with the creatures of Doctor Who does not equal the experience of all people. I more or less feel the exact opposite to everything you feel about them, and I know people who fully agree with me, too. And that doesn’t make my personal experience any more representative of the majority. In a fandom as vast and wildly broken as Doctor Who, any majority opinion is still going to only represent a fraction of the fandom at large. What validates my point is analysis of the media I take in. Like in any Literature essay ever, your viewpoint and argument is valid if you can find evidence to support your point. Which I can.

2) Davies’ heroines did not have similar backgrounds, they had vaguely-similarish heroic character arcs, and that’s not the same thing

Rose, Martha, and Donna had the same background? Seriously? Rose was working-class with a loving but smothering mother (who thought that working as a shopgirl somewhere like Henrik’s would give her airs and graces) and boyfriend she went on cruise control with, the loss of her father had a key and powerful impact on her life through her mother’s stories. Rose’s backstory left her drifting in a life where she could never use her fully potential and didn’t know she had that potential. The Doctor gave her knowledge of her own strength in series one and a full grasp of her abilities by series two.

Martha was raised in a big upper-middle class family that also happened to be broken. Her relationship with both her mum and dad seems to be good, but she’s a go-between for them and appears to be The Great Negotiator in her family. Meanwhile, she clearly loves both her sister and brother and gets along well with them. Martha is getting higher education and has the very high goal of being a doctor (and her whole family is supporting her, not trying to pin her down like Jackie tried, with good intentions, with Rose), and she’s almost there. Martha may not fully understand how amazing she is, but she’s wielding her potential already and aiming for a goal. The Doctor shows her how amazing she is to herself and by the end of series three Martha is ready to leave, knowing how amazing she is, giving her family priority because that’s what she believes is right, and getting the Doctor to come when she calls.

Donna is older than both Martha and Rose, and part of her story is about how she hasn’t lost this potential even if she missed her chance to go with the Doctor the first time. She lacks the confidence of both Martha and Rose, even half a series in when both of them were more or less confident about themselves. That can be owed to her own home life, where Sylvia is verbally abusive and tears Donna down, and Wilf is kind and supportive but doesn’t necessarily push Donna into being more, or better.

How are these three women the same?

The backstories of Moffat’s heroines — Amy, Clara, and River — may be different, but that seems to do diddly for their characterisation. The Moffat heroine tends to be constructed from the same scaffolding tropes with different colours of paint.

And my objection to the Doctor picking up Clara the way he did is not because it’s similar to the way he picked up Amy, it’s because he chooses to take Clara along because she is a metaphorical Rubik’s Cube. Clara is treated as a puzzle to be solved, and despite all characters insisting that Clara is an ordinary girl, Eleven never faces the consequences for treating her as a mystery instead of a person. Instead, he is vindicated. He gets his answer. And then Clara just sort of fades into the background of the following stories until she is needed to emotionally manipulate Eleven, rather than getting more character development.

You seem to think I’m mad about Amy and Clara and River for completely different reasons than I am.

3) Moffat’s queer characters don’t serve as adequate representation

First off, and I cannot scream this loudly enough, Jack was designed by RTD and Moffat’s writing did not give Jack his omnisexual orientation. The assumption that Jack was a Moffat creation flies in the face of everything known in television writing. Please please please don’t start preaching that Moffat designed Jack, because that takes away the success of a gay writer creating a wildly popular and memorable character and gives it to the man who writes and allows sexual assault to be written as a joke.

And I’m not terribly fond of Vastra and Jenny. Even if I was, their relationship exists in the realm of “because I said so” and innuendoes. Compare the loving and very visually obvious relationship between Amy and Rory to Vastra and Jenny. And I would be okay with the lack of any visual cues to their relationship if there was better representation elsewhere. But there isn’t. Canton’s sexuality is written as a punchline and there’s no visual evidence of it existing at all. River’s apparent bisexuality had to be confirmed on Twitter, because there’s no sign of it anywhere in the show. The married marines don’t even have names because they’re such a long list of identifiers, who needs to acknowledge them as people with names?

Really, the number of gay characters in the RTD era was self-parody? Really? Off the top of my head, Shakespeare was bi (as has been speculated in academia for a while), Skye Silvestre’s previous partner had been a woman, Jake was not confirmed to be gay but the writing left loads of people assuming so, Torchwood is its own thing (and I don’t watch it much, so I can’t really say anything about the characters), and the son and footman in “The Unicorn and the Wasp” (who had to keep their relationship secret and still managed to be physically affectionate on screen) were definitely together and it was remarked how cruel that the footman couldn’t openly mourn the death of his lover. I’m certainly there were more, but off the top of my head that’s not a vast majority.

The words “gay agenda” were thrown about during the RTD era, but the four most important characters were three women who were only in heterosexual romances (Rose, Martha, and Donna) and the Doctor, whose sexuality allowed a romance with Rose but was not openly sexual except in Moffat’s episodes, allowing for the argument that the Doctor is on the asexual spectrum or is demisexual. Moffat’s writing for the Doctor has actively defied that theory.

Of course, if RTD was pushing a gay agenda for writing more than a few characters who aren’t straight, then Moffat is a progressive hero for sensationalising people who aren’t straight and making their sexualities into punchlines.

4) Just because you don’t like it doesn’t mean everyone agrees

Confession: I am head-over-heels in love with “Rings of Akhaten” and “Hide” and “Nightmare in Silver” and “The Crimson Horror” (assault of Jenny excluded), but I still think Moffat’s era is weaker than American beer.

Here are some interesting facts for you: “Midnight” is absolutely beloved in my neck of the woods and you disliking it would not appear to be the majority opinion. “The Name of the Doctor” pulled 70% of the viewers “Journey’s End” pulled despite the hype building up to it. Of the ten lowest-viewed regular episodes of New Who, four came from the second half of series seven. Kilodalton did some stats that show audience numbers, on the whole, appear to be dropping. Your praise for “Rings of Akhaten” apply almost word-for-word to “The End of the World” (the Platform One episode that kick-starts Rose’s character growth and shows off some of effects the Time War had on Nine).

You like Moffat, which is great for you, but your critique falls very flat because it relies on deliberate misrepresentations of arguments and personal opinion. Like Moffat all you want, but you’ll not be changing people’s opinion with this.

edited 06/29/14 for readability and tagging

Tags: anti moffat

clarabosswald:

insolitaparvapuella:

clarabosswald:

marriagehoney:

clarabosswald:

sweetdeadlythoughts:

clarabosswald:

friendly reminder that karen gillan doesn’t think moffat’s writing is sexist
you know
the same karen gillan who actually worked with him for a few years, had talks and meetings about her character with him, read his scripts, etc.
yeah the karen gillan who might actually know him in person
doesn’t think he’s sexist

oh, wait, now they’re gonna bring back the “she is being brainwashed” argument. who doesn’t love that argument.

the what argument

I read someone argue that her opinion didn’t matter because she is a white, relatively privileged girl, and therefore is not educated enough about the matter - no seriously.

it’s her character and her showrunner and her show but her opinion doesn’t matter
her opinion as a woman on sexism doesn’t matter
or rtd (who’s gay, but still, a “white privileged man”), yeah

I have reasonably large breasts for someone of my size and have been referred to as “cute” by people who I am quite fond of, but I’ve never been a victim of catcalling or street harassment.

I dress rather poorly and don’t wear make-up and find myself not especially attractive but I have never been called “ugly” or other forms of harassment from strange men.

My granddad says some extremely problematic things on occasion and had acted problematically many times, but I have never considered myself victimized by his behaviour.

This does not mean that my experience is the same for all women. Women obviously are still harassed by strangers for the “sins” of being attractive or ugly. Just because I am not victimized by my granddad’s behaviour doesn’t mean that no one suffers the consequences of them.

If Karen Gillian’s experience with Moffat was good I am genuinely happy for her (better than working with a Hitchcock-esque boss any day of the week), but that doesn’t invalidate the experiences of women who have found Moffat problematic. If Karen thinks Moffat is great, bless her. But she does not speak for the experiences of anyone but herself and using the argument “well Karen Gillian says he’s not sexist” would be like me saying how my granddad is a good person (really) after he openly displays homophobic behaviour.

i agree with what you say, but i think you misunderstood the point i was trying to make.
firstly, a huge part of the argument is whether moffat is even being sexist at all, and the different interpretations of what he says and what he writes. therefore it’s different from the example you gave of your granddad, who, as a given, displayed clear homophobic behavior.
secondly, what i was trying to do with this argument is mainly oppose people who claim that moffat is this or that while not actually knowing him at all. i was giving karen’s comment as an example of someone who actually knows the man himself and his writing very well. i’m not trying to invalidate people who were hurt by moffat’s writing (or how they understood it - every line can be debated over), i’m trying to object to people claiming he, as a person, is horrible and sexist. 

Well, Moffat’s writing has, in my own and others’ perspective, allowed sexist dialogue and tropes without punishing them in the narrative. The Doctor dismisses the extremes of behaviour in River in one scene as “because she is a woman”, enforcing a hideous stereotype that women are irrational beings not in control of their emotions. He is not called out for this, proven wrong, or is otherwise invalidated. The statement the Doctor makes of irrational behaviour being inherent to my sex and gender is not disproven, at all. Moffat writes a line of dialogue that is deeply entrenched in sexist tropes and tacitly validates it.

And I honest-to-goodness don’t mind when characters are sexist or sexist attitudes exist in media, as long as they are somehow invalidated. In Elementary, Sherlock suggests Joan’s general displeasure with the events of the episode might’ve been PMS if not for the fact that it is not that time in her cycle. This allows for a punchline that essentially says “yeah, and that’s not a sexist and unscientific assumption at all”. Sherlock’s sexist statement is invalidated because it is a punchline, something to be mocked. And in later episodes, Sherlock’s misogyny is toned down, his whole attitude of women goes from “a perfumed and pillowy form of release” to “human beings, some of whom are people I have sex with”. His behaviour is invalidated and subsequent character development improves it. Elementary pretty openly embraces a more progressive attitude than many other procedural shows on North American television, so it’s not hard to see the writers’ intentions to be more feminist-friendly.

I do not know Steven Moffat personally, but his work displays a casual sexism that is not consciously rejected. I do not know the writing team of Elementary personally, but their work generally displays a conscious rejection of sexism.

So maybe Moffat is the Platonic Ideal of a feminist in his daily life, that does not excuse his work from criticism. People who say Moffat is sexist may be making an assumption, but I would argue it is an educated guess based on the material they’ve seen in his writing.

I more or less agree with you that ad hominem attacks are super lame, but people who call Moffat sexist are doing it because they’ve read sexism in the work and see it tacitly approved by him in his and other episodes. That sexism didn’t just burst from nowhere, it had to have come from someone. And if that somewhere is Moffat’s own mind, it is not unreasonable to ask questions about Moffat’s own opinions on sexism.

clarabosswald:

marriagehoney:

clarabosswald:

sweetdeadlythoughts:

clarabosswald:

friendly reminder that karen gillan doesn’t think moffat’s writing is sexist
you know
the same karen gillan who actually worked with him for a few years, had talks and meetings about her character with him, read his scripts, etc.
yeah the karen gillan who might actually know him in person
doesn’t think he’s sexist

oh, wait, now they’re gonna bring back the “she is being brainwashed” argument. who doesn’t love that argument.

the what argument

I read someone argue that her opinion didn’t matter because she is a white, relatively privileged girl, and therefore is not educated enough about the matter - no seriously.

it’s her character and her showrunner and her show but her opinion doesn’t matter
her opinion as a woman on sexism doesn’t matter
or rtd (who’s gay, but still, a “white privileged man”), yeah

I have reasonably large breasts for someone of my size and have been referred to as “cute” by people who I am quite fond of, but I’ve never been a victim of catcalling or street harassment.

I dress rather poorly and don’t wear make-up and find myself not especially attractive but I have never been called “ugly” or other forms of harassment from strange men.

My granddad says some extremely problematic things on occasion and had acted problematically many times, but I have never considered myself victimized by his behaviour.

This does not mean that my experience is the same for all women. Women obviously are still harassed by strangers for the “sins” of being attractive or ugly. Just because I am not victimized by my granddad’s behaviour doesn’t mean that no one suffers the consequences of them.

If Karen Gillian’s experience with Moffat was good I am genuinely happy for her (better than working with a Hitchcock-esque boss any day of the week), but that doesn’t invalidate the experiences of women who have found Moffat problematic. If Karen thinks Moffat is great, bless her. But she does not speak for the experiences of anyone but herself and using the argument “well Karen Gillian says he’s not sexist” would be like me saying how my granddad is a good person (really) after he openly displays homophobic behaviour.